WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
May 20 2024
WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
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“Serious concerns” raised by undercover officers as suspect escapes prosecution

“Serious concerns” raised by undercover officers as suspect escapes prosecution

Confidential documents made available to the Guardian have revealed that two undercover police officers have raised “serious concerns” following a decision not to prosecute a potential murder suspect in the Darren Poole case.

Darren Poole was 38 years old when he was found dead in his flat in Birkenhead in Wirral in August 2015. Mr Poole was found lying on his back with a large volume of blood present around his body and head.

Merseyside police launched operation Carnaby to investigate the circumstances surrounding his death. As part of this operation, an undercover officer spent months befriending an individual that was considered likely responsible for Mr Poole’s death. The officer was subsequently able to obtain a covert recording of the suspect where he admitted to striking Mr Poole in his flat.

However, prosecutors have allegedly identified concerns in the way the police operation was carried out and found that the circumstances surrounding how the confession was obtained may be deemed oppressive, contrary to procedural rules which allows a judge to dismiss the evidence at trial. On that basis, prosecutors have concluded they will not put the man on trial.

The Guardian reports that the undercover officers involved have complained about the decision made not to prosecute the suspect and have accused Merseyside police of “major failings.”.

This latest criticism is another setback in the investigation into Mr Poole’s murder. The Merseyside police have previously been subject to criticism for mistakes made in their investigation. The police had initially treated Mr Poole’s death as not suspicious, despite him having suffered wounds to his head and face. However, the coroner’s inquest later concluded that Mr Poole’s death was unlawful finding that it was ‘clear the injuries sustained by Darren to the head were as a result of three separate and distinct impacts.’

In responding, Mr Poole’s family have said they “simply could not accept” the decision and that they are ‘desperately sad and shocked that there has been no conviction…No words can express the sadness and ongoing trauma we have felt everyday since’ his death.