WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
April 19 2024
WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
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Former Police Federation head to face misconduct charges

Former Police Federation head to face misconduct charges

Emergency lights, Etolane, Flickr under Creative Comms,

The former head of the Police Federation is set to face gross misconduct proceedings over his behaviour in late 2021. John Apter was suspended last year for allegations of misconduct on four occasions, including at a bravery awards ceremony. Apet led the Police Federation of England and Wales, representing over 130,000 police officers from constables to chief inspectors.

The former head was investigated for two criminal allegations of sexual assault, the evidence of which was handed to the CPS by the police watchdog. The CPS found the Independent Office for Police Conduct’s (IOPC) evidence to not meet the level required for a prosecution.

‘We completed our investigation in June 2022 into allegations relating to the conduct of a now retired Hampshire and Isle of Wright constabulary police officer,’ the IOPC stated.

While the CPS did not find the evidence enough to prosecute, the IOPC ‘found an indication of gross misconduct for potential breaches of the police professional standards of behaviour relating to authority, respect and courtesy; equally and diversity; and conduct,’ an IOPC spokesperson continued. On this basis, the watchdog will liaise with the police to arrange a misconduct hearing.

These proceedings are the most recent after a string of similar allegations over dozens of officers over the last year. Earlier this month, officers faced misconduct charges over mishandling reports of Wayne Couzens’ criminal activity before the rape and murder of Sarah Everard, to which he entered a guilty plea. Last month, serial rapist Constable David Carrick pleaded guilty to 43 offences, including 20 counts of rape. As a result of Carrick’s conviction, police agencies have been instructed to check all officers and staff against national police databases to detect other predators who may have “slipped through the net.”

In response, the Metropolitan Police asked 253 retired officers with proven misconduct records to re-join the force, along with 99 retired officers who retired mid-investigation.