WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
July 13 2024
WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
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Met Police accused of using human rights legislation to block protests

Met Police accused of using human rights legislation to block protests

An anti-monarchy campaign group has accused the Metropolitan Police of using human rights legislation to block protests against the monarchy that have been arranged for this weekend’s trooping the colour.

King Charles will make a high-profile appearance on Saturday to mark the monarch’s official birthday. The group, Republic, state that they have been asked to ‘protest well away from Buckingham Palace and away from the parade, where we will not be seen or heard’.

Republic says that the Metropolitan Police wrote to them regarding the planned protest and the Guardian has reported that the letter says:

‘You are absolutely entitled to protest and this engages rights protected by the European convention on human rights. We are, however seeking to balance those rights and the rights of those present both taking part in the event and those who come to spectate and enjoy their rights under the convention as well.’

Last year, anti-monarchy protesters, were arrested last year prior to the protest at the coronation which led to criticism of the Met Police. The chief executive of Republic, Graham Smith, was one of those arrested last year, and has since sought legal action to challenge the police, fighting protection of the right to meaningful protest.

Graham Smith has stated that to see human rights used in this fashion is a ‘worrying development’. The right to protest is protected by articles 10 and 11 of the European Convention on Human Rights. These rights are incorporated into UK legislation by the Human Rights Act 1998.

This comes during an uncertain time for human rights legislation in the UK with Prime Minister Rishi Sunak stating that ‘a Conservative government will quit the European Court of Human Rights if necessary’.

If the ban goes ahead Graham Smith has pledged to ‘do everything in [his] power to challenge that decision’ and calls upon the government to ‘address this attack on our rights’.

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