WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
April 20 2024
WE ARE A MAGAZINE ABOUT LAW AND JUSTICE | AND THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE TWO
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Judge names Metropolitan Police Officer charged with shooting Chris Kaba

Judge names Metropolitan Police Officer charged with shooting Chris Kaba

The Metropolitan Police Officer who killed Chris Kaba has been named for the first time as Martyn Blake.
A judge lifted his anonymity order after a challenge by media organisations which argued that the case should be held in public.
Chris Kaba was 24 when he was driving in Streatham, South London when he was stopped by the police in a Met operation in September 2022. A few moments later, Mr Kaba was shot in the head by a Police firearms officer and died later in hospital.
Following challenges made to the anonymity order by media organisations, Mr Justice Lucraft made known the identity of the officer known to the public on the basis that such requirement was necessary to strengthen confidence in the criminal justice system.
The BBC reported that Mr Blake was granted bail and will go on trial in October.
Lord Justice Lucraft in his decision on whether the office should remain anonymous, and said ‘the naming of the defendant, or the giving of his date of birth, does not give rise to a real and immediate risk to his life’.
Publication of the officer’s address or photos will remain subject to restrictions.
Since 1990, twelve on-duty police officers have been charged with murder and/ or manslaughter involved in a fatality; this is the fourth charge involving a police shooting.
Critical evidence from inquiries, investigations, and inquests has never resulted in the conviction of a police shooting victim for murder or manslaughter by an on-duty police officer.
Anita Sharmar, a caseworker, representing Mr Kaba’s family, said ‘in any other murder trial the accused would be publicly named; this case should be no different’.
Director of INQUEST, Deborah Coles, said: ‘Police cannot and should not be above the law. Accountability for police officers and forces involved in death, even where evidence of criminality and wrongdoing is identified, is extremely rare.’
‘In any other murder trial, the accused would be publicly named. This case is no different. We welcome today’s decision.’